Where is the Venera 1 probe now


Missions to Venus

MissionCountryLaunch DateArrival DateTypeEncounter Characteristics

Venera 1USSRFebruary 12, 1961----FlybyNow in solar orbit
Mariner 2USAAugust 27, 1962December 14, 1962FlybyClosest approach: 34,833 km
Zond 1USSRApril 2, 1964----ProbeNow in solar orbit
Venera 2USSRNovember 12, 1965----FlybyCommunications failed just before arrival.
Now in solar orbit.
Venera 3USSRNovember 16, 1965----Atmospheric ProbeCommunications failed just before atmosphere entry.
Crashed on Venus
Venera 4USSRJune 12, 1967October 18, 1967Atmospheric ProbeFirst probe to be placed directly in the atmosphere and to return atmospheric data.
It was crushed by the pressure on Venus before it reached the surface.
Mariner 5USAJune 14, 1967October 19, 1967FlybyClosest approach: 3900 km
Venera 5USSRJanuary 5, 1969May 16, 1969Atmospheric ProbeBurn-up
Venera 6USSRJanuary 10, 1969May 17, 1969Atmospheric ProbeReturned data down to within 11 km of the surface before being crushed by the pressure.
Venera 7USSRAugust 17, 1970December 15, 1970LanderFirst successful landing of a spacecraft on another planet.
Returned 23 minutes of data.
Venera 8USSRMarch 27, 1972July 22, 1972LanderReturned data for 50 minutes
Mariner 10USANovember 3, 1973February 5, 1974FlybyDual planet mission to Venus and Mercury.
Closest approach: 5700 km
Images of cloud top
Venera 9USSRJune 8, 1975October 22, 1975OrbiterPeriapsis: 1560 km
Apoapsis: 112,200 km
Period: 48 hours, 18 min
Inclination: 34* 10'
Photographed clouds and looked at the upper atmosphere.
LanderTransmitted first black and white pictures of the planet's surface
Venera 10USSRJune 14, 1975October 25, 1975OrbiterPeriapsis: 1620 km
Apoapsis: 113,900 km
Period: 49 hours, 23 min
Inclination: 29* 30'
Photographed clouds and looked at the upper atmosphere
LanderTransmitted black and white photographs of the terrain.
Pioneer Venus 1 (Pioneer 12)USAMay 20, 1978December 4, 1978OrbiterPeriapsis: 200 km
Apoapsis: 66,000 km
Period: 24 hours
Inclination: 29* 30'
Operated until 1992 when contact was lost.
First spacecraft to use radar in mapping the planet's surface.
Pioneer Venus 2 (Pioneer 13)USAAugust 8, 1978December 9, 1978Atmospheric Probe4 probes parachuted through the atmosphere.
Venera 11USSRSeptember 9, 1978December 25, 1978FlybyClosest approach: 25,000 km
LanderReturned data for 95 minutes.
Imaging systems failed.
Venera 12USSRSeptember 14, 1978December 21, 1978FlybyClosest approach: 25,000 km
LanderReturned data for 110 minutes.
Electrical discharges were recorded.
Venera 13USSROctober 30, 1981March 1, 1982Flyby
LanderFirst color panoramic views of the planet's surface.
Conducted soil analysis.
Venera 14USSRNovember 4, 1981March 5, 1982Flyby
Entry probeReturned both black & white and color panoramic views of the planet's surface.
Conducted soil analysis.
Venera 15USSRJune 2, 1983October 10, 1983OrbiterRadar imaging
Venera 16USSRJune 7, 1983October 14, 1983OrbiterRadar imaging
Vega 1USSRDecember 15, 1984June 11, 1985Balloon/LanderVega 1 dropped off a Venera style lander and a balloon.
The lander's soil experiment failed.
The balloon floated for about 48 hours.
Now in solar orbit.
Vega 2USSRDecember 21, 1984June 15, 1985Balloon/LanderVega 2 dropped off a Venera style lander and a balloon.
The lander conducted soil experiments.
The balloon floated for about 48 hours.
Now in solar orbit.
GalileoUSA & EuropeOctober 18, 1989February 10, 1990FlybyImages and near-infrared data on clouds.
Used Venus to pick up speed on its way to Jupiter.
MagellanUSAMay 4, 1989August 10, 1990OrbiterMapped Venus using synthetic aperture radar.
The imaging system produced images at 300 meters resolution.

An Overview of Space Exploration

Shop Windows to the Universe Science Store!

Our online store includes books on science education, ranging from evolution, classroom research, and the need for science and math literacy!